In Need of Institutional Grit

By Watson Scott Swail, President & Senior Research Scholar, Educational Policy Institute To listen to today’s Swail Letter on your device, click on the podcast icon below. Last week I wrote about the issues of college admissions, selectivity, and grit. I can’t seem to read anything lately without hearing more about grit. As mentioned, grit is a term coined, to a degree, by Angela Duckworth in … Continue reading In Need of Institutional Grit

College Admissions, Selectivity, and Grit

By Watson Scott Swail, President & Senior Research Scholar, Educational Policy Institute In 2013, Angela Duckworth became a bit of a phenomenon for her book “Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance.” She toured the talk shows and became the flag-bearer for showcasing that individual passion had much more to do with future ability than purely academics. Five years later, there are many critics of the … Continue reading College Admissions, Selectivity, and Grit

The New Dropout Crisis? Not so New

By Watson Scott Swail, President & Senior Research Scholar, Educational Policy Institute The New York Times David Leonhardt, one of the few journalists that I read on a daily basis, published an article this morning on the “new dropout crisis.” The crisis, in this case, is that the national college dropout rate has eclipsed the national high school dropout rate. While I am glad to see … Continue reading The New Dropout Crisis? Not so New

I’ll take US Higher Education for $400, Alex

By Watson Scott Swail, President & Senior Research Scholar, Educational Policy Institute Alex: Well, we have a barn burner today, folks. Scott, you’re still in command of the board and close to clinching, so go ahead and make a selection. Scott: Thanks, Alex, let’s go “US Higher Education for $400,” please. Alex: Well, its today’s Daily Double. [crowd goes crazy] Scott: I’ll wager $2,000, Alex. Alex: … Continue reading I’ll take US Higher Education for $400, Alex

15 to Finish More Complicated Than it Sounds

By Watson Scott Swail, President & Senior Research Scholar, Educational Policy Institute Did you know that only one third of four-year public students who earn a bachelor’s degree do so in four years? Another 25 percent complete in the fifth year, and a whopping 36 percent completing in six or more years[1]. Think about that for a moment. Truly the cost, in terms of fiscal … Continue reading 15 to Finish More Complicated Than it Sounds