Tag Archives: Higher Education

In Need of Institutional Grit

By Watson Scott Swail, President & Senior Research Scholar, Educational Policy Institute To listen to today’s Swail Letter on your device, click on the podcast icon below. Last week I wrote about the issues of college admissions, selectivity, and grit. I … Continue reading

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Declining Enrollments? Not Such a Big Deal

By Watson Scott Swail, President & Senior Research Scholar, Educational Policy Institute A new report released yesterday by the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC) reported that undergraduate enrollments were down 1.3 percent from the previous year, equivalent to 231,674 students from the … Continue reading

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Cliff Notes

By Watson Scott Swail, President & Senior Research Scholar, Educational Policy Institute Cliff Adelman passed away last week. To the uninitiated, Cliff was arguably the best data analyst on student issues that this world has ever seen. This is not an … Continue reading

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The Texas College Dilemma: How Big? How Much?

By Watson Scott Swail, President & Senior Research Scholar, Educational Policy Institute The San Antonio Express-News wrote an opinion yesterday on the expansion of higher education in Texas. Senate Bill 828, which failed earlier this year, would give authority to expand … Continue reading

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Matching Skills, Credentials, and Jobs

by Dr. Watson Scott Swail, President & Senior Research Scientist, Educational Policy Institute I’ve long made the connection between the relatively lack of connection between a college degree and the workforce in terms of skill sets. Sure, many of the … Continue reading

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Debating How Much Education Society Really Needs

The question for many of those that do change occupations is whether their changes are due to their lack of a “higher education,” or because they do not possess the requisite skills to earn a stable living in a volatile world? The common perception, and a perception voiced in Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce, is that high school students do not possess the attributes for this and future workforce because many of the future jobs will require postsecondary education. Continue reading

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Legislation to Improve Graduation Rates Could Have the Opposite Effect

By Watson Scott Swail, President & Senior Scholar, Educational Policy Institute This is an opinion piece I wrote for the Chronicle Review and published on January 23, 2004. I stumbled upon it the other day and thought it was worth a repost … Continue reading

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Pushing Tin

By Watson Scott Swail, Ed.D. A new publication Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) report illustrates that the most popular undergraduate programs remain in the arts and humanities, social sciences, and journalism. However, they are also the least employed of … Continue reading

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What Impact do the Trump Tax Cuts Have on Education?

by Dr. Watson Scott Swail, President & Senior Research Scientist Yesterday the Trump Administration, through the auspices of Steve Mnuchin and Gary Cohn, released a trial balloon to test their tax plan in the media and Congress. True to Trump’s … Continue reading

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So How Much Does Student Departure Cost Your Institution?

By Dr. Watson Scott Swail, President & CEO, Educational Policy Institute In 2013, state and federal governments spent approximately $150 billion on higher education. This includes funding for Pell Grants, state grants, research, and direct subsidies for students. To put … Continue reading

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